06MOSCOW6389, HUMAN RIGHTS OMBUDSMAN LUKIN AGREES WITH USG

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Reference ID Created Released Classification Origin
06MOSCOW6389 2006-06-15 14:31 2011-08-30 01:44 CONFIDENTIAL Embassy Moscow

VZCZCXRO0407
OO RUEHDBU
DE RUEHMO #6389/01 1661431
ZNY CCCCC ZZH
O 151431Z JUN 06
FM AMEMBASSY MOSCOW
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC IMMEDIATE 7681
INFO RUCNCIS/CIS COLLECTIVE
RUEHXD/MOSCOW POLITICAL COLLECTIVE

C O N F I D E N T I A L SECTION 01 OF 02 MOSCOW 006389 
 
SIPDIS 
 
SIPDIS 
 
E.O. 12958: DECL: 06/15/2016 
TAGS: PGOV PHUM PREL KDEM PINR RS
SUBJECT: HUMAN RIGHTS OMBUDSMAN LUKIN AGREES WITH USG 
PROPOSALS ON U.S-RUSSIAN HUMAN RIGHTS DIALOGUE 
 
REF: STATE 096299 
 
Classified By: Political Minister-Counselor Kirk Augustine.  Reason 1.4 
 (b, d) 
 
 1. (C) SUMMARY.  In a June 14 meeting, Human Rights 
Ombudsman Vladimir Lukin agreed with the proposals put 
forward by EUR DAS David Kramer regarding a U.S.-Russian 
human rights dialogue.  Lukin shared the view that it would 
be beneficial to announce the creation of the dialogue at the 
G8 summit.  He also agreed that the Carnegie Endowment for 
International Peace should play the lead role in the effort. 
Lukin said the GOR could likely provide some funding for the 
initiative, which, could be titled "Roundtable on Democracy 
and Human Rights."  Lukin said that as a next step he would 
discuss the idea, now in its more developed form, with 
Kremlin Foreign Policy Advisor Sergey Prikhodko, as well as 
consulting further with Carnegie and the Embassy.  In 
response to Kramer's question regarding Mikhail 
Khodorkovskiy, Lukin said that Khodorkovskiy's wife and 
lawyer had good access to the imprisoned former Yukos CEO. 
Lukin also theorized that Procurator General Dmitriy Ustinov 
was removed because he had committed some specific misdeed, 
rather than for political reasons. END SUMMARY. 
 
HUMAN RIGHTS AND DEMOCRACY ROUNDTABLE 
------------------------------------- 
 
2. (C) Kramer told Lukin that the USG welcomed Lukin's idea 
(reftel) for a U.S.-Russian human rights and democracy 
experts discussion, and hoped it might be announced by the 
President and President Putin at the G8 Summit.  He noted 
that the USG envisioned having the dialogue begin in the 
fall, preferably September.  Lukin agreed that a Summit 
announcement by the two presidents would give the initiative 
more stature, and concurred with Kramer's point about the 
timing. 
 
3. (C) To help organize the initiative, Kramer suggested 
finding an NGO that had offices in both Moscow and 
Washington.  He noted that the Carnegie Endowment for 
International Peace met those criteria and had expressed 
interest in organizing the event.  Lukin agreed that Carnegie 
was a good choice and added that he had long and positive 
experience working successfully with Moscow Carnegie Center 
Director Rose Gottemoeller.  Kramer noted that he had met 
earlier in the day with Gottemoeller, who had welcomed the 
possibility of Carnegie playing a major role in the 
initiative. 
 
4. (C) Turning to operational details, Lukin agreed with 
Kramer that Carnegie would invite the participants, which 
would include some government representatives.  Lukin also 
concurred with Kramer that it was important to limit the 
number of participants to about eight to ten people on each 
side.  Lukin thought it was a good idea to have Carnegie come 
up with the themes for discussion, with each government 
having the right to suggest themes as well.   Regarding 
funding, Kramer said that government participants could pay 
their own way, Carnegie could seek a grant to cover costs, 
but that both the USG and GOR might provide a small amount of 
funding.  In response, Lukin told Kramer that the GOR could 
likely provide funding.  Lukin agreed with Kramer that it 
would be important for funding to be fully transparent, with 
decisions on how funds are spent to be left to Carnegie after 
it consulted with both governments.  Regarding what the 
initiative would be called, Lukin agreed that a name like 
"Roundtable on Democracy and Human Rights" would be 
appropriate. 
 
5. (C) Lukin said that the GOR had found similar discussions 
on human rights with other European countries useful, and 
that a roundtable could help strengthen U.S.-Russian 
relations.  He pledged to speak with Kremlin Foreign Policy 
Advisor Prikhodko about the proposal when Prikhodko returns 
from his current trip to China, and added that he would also 
have follow up discussions with the Ambassador and 
Gottemoeller. 
 
KHODORKOVSKIY 
------------- 
 
6. (C) Kramer expressed concern about the treatment of 
imprisoned former Yukos CEO Mikhail Khodorkovskiy.  Lukin 
stated that the courts had recently upheld the decision to 
transfer Khodorkovskiy to Chita, but also ruled that 
Khodorkovskiy's transfer to solitary confinement as a 
punishment for possessing Ministry of Justice documents on 
prisoners' rights was illegal.  In response to Kramer's 
question regarding access for Khodorkovskiy's lawyers and 
wife, Lukin responded that while there had been some issues, 
 
MOSCOW 00006389  002 OF 002 
 
 
overall they had decent access to Khodorkovskiy. 
 
USTINOV 
------- 
 
7. (C) Turning to the political situation more broadly, Lukin 
said that the GOR was focusing at the moment on a successful 
G8.  Noting that the Kremlin was secretive, he pointed to the 
June 2 removal of Procurator General Vladimir Ustinov as an 
example.  Lukin suggested that even some of the figures wh
o 
had implemented the decision had not known about it until the 
last minute.  Ustinov had been removed because Putin had 
received some specific troubling information about him, Lukin 
speculated.  If Putin had him fired as part of a shift of 
power within the Kremlin, he would had immediately offered a 
replacement as Procurator General, Lukin theorized. 
 
8. (U) DAS Kramer did not have an opportunity to clear this 
cable. 
BURNS

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