08MOSCOW1817, RUSSIA CONCERNED WITH UNSCR 1267 DELISTING OF

WikiLeaks Link

To understand the justification used for the classification of each cable, please use this WikiSource article as reference.
Discussing cables
If you find meaningful or important information in a cable, please link directly to its unique reference number. Linking to a specific paragraph in the body of a cable is also possible by copying the appropriate link (to be found at theparagraph symbol).Please mark messages for social networking services like Twitter with the hash tags #cablegate and a hash containing the reference ID e.g. #08MOSCOW1817.
Reference ID Created Released Classification Origin
08MOSCOW1817 2008-06-25 13:03 2011-08-30 01:44 CONFIDENTIAL Embassy Moscow

VZCZCXRO2810
PP RUEHPW RUEHTRO
DE RUEHMO #1817 1771303
ZNY CCCCC ZZH
P 251303Z JUN 08
FM AMEMBASSY MOSCOW
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC PRIORITY 8760
INFO RUCNAFG/AFGHANISTAN COLLECTIVE
RUEHXD/MOSCOW POLITICAL COLLECTIVE
RUEHGG/UN SECURITY COUNCIL COLLECTIVE

C O N F I D E N T I A L MOSCOW 001817 
 
SIPDIS 
 
E.O. 12958: DECL: 06/25/2018 
TAGS: PGOV PREL PTER KTFN UNSC AF RS
SUBJECT: RUSSIA CONCERNED WITH UNSCR 1267 DELISTING OF 
TALIBAN 
 
Classified By: Acting Political Counselor Robert Patterson for reasons 
1.4 (b/d). 
 
1. (C) MFA Department of International Organizations Director 
Gennadiy Gatilov told IO DAS Brian Hook on June 19 that 
Russia was concerned with the process of reconciling Taliban 
with the Afghan government and would continue to approach 
1267 delisting cautiously.  He explained that the GOR did not 
want individuals removed from the 1267 list without "serious 
grounds" for doing so and required guarantees from the 
countries requesting delisting that these people would not 
return to terrorism.  Gatilov said the GOR did not disagree 
with delisting per se, but moved slowly on each delisting 
request to ensure there would be "no mistakes."  When Hook 
asked why the GOR was willing to accept reconciliation in 
other countries, such as Iraq, but not in Afghanistan, 
Gatilov responded that Russia had a "good understanding" of 
the situation in Afghanistan. 
 
2. (C) Gatilov dismissed the suggestion that the Russian 
Ambassador in Kabul was particularly skeptical of delisting, 
joking that perhaps the Ambassador "just knows better." 
Gatilov resisted Hook's suggestion that the Russian 
Ambassador meet several individuals that have reconciled with 
the Afghan government and are proposed for delisting, 
explaining that the GOR relied on its Embassy to report on 
specific delisting requests but final decisions were made by 
"competent authorities" in Moscow. 
 
3. (C) Gatilov and Hook agreed on the necessity of listing 
narcotraffickers whose activities financed terrorists in 
Afghanistan, although Hook explained that without the 
prospect of eventual delisting there was little incentive for 
them to change their behavior.  Hook stressed the need to 
delist individuals, since keeping them on the list meant a 
"life sentence" that created problems with several European 
countries that were concerned about a lack of due process and 
resisted new listings.  Gatilov appeared unconvinced by this 
argument, but agreed to work on a case-by-case basis on 
delisting to see if progress could be made. 
RUSSELL

Wikileaks

Advertisements
Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: