Category Archives: UNCLASSIFIED//FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY

10MOSCOW226, SCENESETTER FOR FEBRUARY 4 U.S.-RUSSIA BILATERAL

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Reference ID Created Released Classification Origin
10MOSCOW226 2010-01-29 15:33 2011-08-30 01:44 UNCLASSIFIED//FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY Embassy Moscow

VZCZCXRO1600
PP RUEHDBU RUEHLN RUEHPOD RUEHPW RUEHSK RUEHSL RUEHVK RUEHYG
DE RUEHMO #0226/01 0291533
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
P 291533Z JAN 10
FM AMEMBASSY MOSCOW
TO RHEHAAA/WHITE HOUSE WASHDC PRIORITY
RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC PRIORITY 6110
INFO RUCNAFG/AFGHANISTAN COLLECTIVE
RUCNCIS/CIS COLLECTIVE
RUEHXD/MOSCOW POLITICAL COLLECTIVE
RHEHNSC/NSC WASHDC
RUEABND/DEA HQS WASHINGTON DC
RUEATRS/DEPT OF TREASURY WASHDC
RUEKJCS/SECDEF WASHDC

UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 04 MOSCOW 000226 
 
SENSITIVE 
SIPDIS 
 
FOR ONDCP DIRECTOR DIRECTOR KERLIKOWSKE FROM AMB. BEYRLE 
EUR-RS FOR CAROLINE SAVAGE 
 
E.O. 12958: N/A 
TAGS: PGOV PREL SNAR KCRM RS AF
SUBJECT: SCENESETTER FOR FEBRUARY 4 U.S.-RUSSIA BILATERAL 
PRESIDENTIAL DRUG TRAFFICKING WORKING GROUP MEETING 
 
This information is Sensitive But Unclassified.  Do Not 
Release to Public Internet. 
 
1.    (SBU) Summary: The U.S. and Russia have powerful 
reasons to work together to combat illicit trafficking of 
narcotics.  As you heard in September from your counterpart 
on the working group, Viktor Ivanov, Director of Russian 
Federal Drug Control Service (FSKN), his priority is engaging 
you on Afghanistan and specifically suppressing the flow into 
Russia of Afghan-origin heroin.  Heroin from Afghanistan 
floods Russia leading to high rates of addiction;   money 
from the heroin trade finances terrorist organizations 
fiercely hostile to the U.S. and Russia.  Ivanov and others 
in the Russian government take issue with the new U.S. 
whole-of-government approach which emphasizes interdiction 
over eradication of poppy fields to reduce the production and 
distribution of Afghan heroin.  The U.S. and Russia also have 
different approaches on how to best reduce demand for heroin 
within Russia. Although our principal policies on combating 
the Afghan narcotics trade differ, however, the establishment 
of this inter-agency working group has provided new 
opportunities to discuss counternarcotics cooperation in 
Afghanistan as well as prevention and treatment of substance 
abuse, financial controls, and international best practices. 
In addition, the working group has paved a political opening 
for increased peer-to-peer exchanges and cooperation on the 
enforcement front.  The adverse consequences of inaction or 
non-cooperation are too severe, particularly for Russia. End 
Summary. 
 
------------------------------ 
Heroin Trafficking into Russia 
------------------------------ 
 
2.    (SBU) Trafficking in opiates from Afghanistan 
(primarily opium and heroin) and their abuse are major 
problems facing Russian law enforcement and public health 
agencies. The UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) reported 
in October 2009 that Russia has become the largest single 
market for Afghan-origin heroin, consuming approximately 
75,000-80,000 kilograms per year (20 percent of the annual 
production of Afghan heroin).  Russia has one of the highest 
rates of opiate abuse in the world.  Opiates (and hashish to 
a lesser degree) from Afghanistan are smuggled into Russia 
through the Central Asian states along the "Northern Route." 
Russians at all levels routinely blame the U.S. for its 
failure to curb opium production in Afghanistan, some even 
seeing in this failure a plot to undermine Russia.  FSKN 
Director Ivanov has repeatedly and publicly called on the 
U.S. to carry out broad eradication of poppy fields in 
Afghanistan. 
 
--------------------------------------------- --------------- 
Scope of Drug Addiction Problem and the Treatment of Drug 
Offenders 
--------------------------------------------- --------------- 
 
3.    (SBU) The Russian Ministry of Health estimates that up 
to six million people (4.2 percent of the population) take 
drugs on a regular basis in Russia; according to official 
estimates, 30,000-40,000 people die annually of drug 
overdoses and another 70,000 deaths are considered 
drug-related.  Health experts estimate that nearly 65 percent 
of newly detected HIV cases can be attributed to drug use and 
that, among HIV-positive injecting drug users, about 85-90 
percent are Hepatitis C positive.  The FSKN reports that 
there are 400,000 officially registered drug addicts in 
Russia's treatment centers.  A Human Rights Watch study 
concluded, however, that the effectiveness of treatment 
offered at state drug treatment clinics "is so low as to be 
negligible" and constitutes a "violation of the right to 
health."  New models of cognitive therapy are being 
implemented in treatment centers in St. Petersburg, but 
substitution therapy (such as programs using methadone, 
buprenorphine, and naltrexone) has not been fully explored. 
Methadone remains illegal and politically sensitive. 
 
4.    (SBU) Director Ivanov has expressed interest in 
studying the drug court systems used in the U.S. to divert 
non-violent, substance abusing offenders from prison and jail 
 
MOSCOW 00000226  002 OF 004 
 
 
into treatment.  A decade of research indicates that drug 
courts reduce crime by lowering re-arrest and conviction 
rates, improving substance abuse treatment outcomes, and 
reuniting families, and also produces measurable cost 
benefits.  Court reform is an extremely complex subject, and 
Russia lacks the social service infrastructure that supports 
drug courts in the U.S.  However, Ivanov's interest in drug 
courts is encouraging, and your working group can foster 
cooperation and information exch
anges between judges, 
lawyers, public health experts and social service 
professionals to assist Russia in moving towards alternatives 
to the criminal prosecution of drug addicts and substance 
abusers. 
 
--------------------------------------------- --------------- 
Domestic and International Drug Enforcement Policy and 
Activities 
--------------------------------------------- --------------- 
 
5.    (SBU) The State Anti-Narcotics Committee is a 
governmental steering body for developing proposals for the 
President on national anti-narcotics policy, coordinating the 
activities of various government agencies, and participating 
in international drug enforcement cooperation efforts.  The 
Committee is chaired by Director Ivanov and comprises seven 
federal ministers, 14 heads of federal services, a Ministry 
of Foreign Affairs representative, members of the Duma and 
the Federation Council, and other officials.  The State 
Anti-Narcotics Committee was tasked with developing a new 
national drug control strategy by President Medvedev in 2009. 
 A draft of a ten-year strategy was recently released; once 
finalized and adopted, it will be in force through 2020.  The 
strategy takes its own whole of government approach as it 
calls on regional anti-narcotQ commissions, local 
governmenQ community organizations, and religious 
associations to be involved.  Its objectives: reduce the 
supply of illegal Qugs, develop and strengthen intQational 
cooperation in counternarcotics, create and implement 
nationwide measures to curb the illegal distribution of 
narcotics, develop effective measures to counter drug 
trafficking, ensure reliable state control over the illicit 
movement of drugs and their precursors, and drug abuse 
prevention. 
 
6.    (SBU) The FSKN is Russia's only law enforcement agency 
dedicated solely to enforcing the narcotics laws.  The FSKN, 
which has approximately 35,000 employees and branch offices 
in every region of Russia, has the responsibility of 
coordinating the narcotics enforcement activities of other 
Russian law enforcement agencies. The U.S. Drug Enforcement 
Administration (DEA) has a working relationship with the 
FSKN, but cooperation on cases and sharing information is 
sporadic and needs to be improved.   Despite FSKN's size and 
coordinating authority over other police agencies, it has not 
conducted significant cases of heroin distribution 
organizations within Russia.  In addition, although FSKN has 
publicly stressed the importance of addressing money 
laundering and other financial aspects of the drug trade, its 
relationship with Rosfinmonitoring has not been productive. 
Seizures and forfeitures of drug proceeds are insignificant 
compared to the volume of heroin sales within Russia. 
However, FSKN's participation in December in the Illicit 
Finance Working Group, whose work compliments that of the 
Drug Trafficking Working Group, is a positive development 
which may lead to more effective financial investigations of 
drug trafficking organizations.  The FSKN has made efforts to 
implement effective monitoring of the chemical industry. 
Prior to the creation of the FSKN, precursor chemicals and 
pharmaceuticals were governed by a patchwork of regulations 
enforced by different agencies.  Production, transportation, 
distribution, and import/export of controlled substances now 
require licensing from the FSKN. 
 
7.    (SBU) The Central Asian Regional Information and 
Coordination Center (CARICC), based in  Almaty, serves as a 
regional focal point for communication, analysis, and 
exchange of operational information in "real time" on 
cross-border crime, as well as a center for the organization 
and coordination of joint operations.  In September 2009, 
President Medvedev agreed to Russian participation at CARICC, 
 
MOSCOW 00000226  003 OF 004 
 
 
which may encourage greater commitment from Central Asian 
nations.  However, Russia sees the Collective Security Treaty 
Organization (CSTO), comprising Russia and Central Asian 
countries as an alternative to CARICC and the NATO-Russia 
Council (NRC), and has spoken of establishing a coordination 
center like CARICC within CSTO.  Twice per year, the CSTO 
conducts operation "Canal", a week-long interdiction blitz on 
the Northern route based on shared intelligence among member 
states.  The effectiveness of this approach is questionable. 
The U.S. believes that multilateral efforts through the 
NATO-Russia Council and CARICC should be the primary means 
for advancing our shared goals though we are willing to 
consider proposals made by the CSTO. 
 
8.     (SBU) In 2006, then-President Putin authorized the 
FSKN to station 50 officers in foreign states to facilitate 
information sharing and joint investigations.  The FSKN has 
opened, or plans to open, liaison offices in at least ten 
countries, including four of the five Central Asian 
republics.  Russia has indicated that its drug liaison 
officer in Kazakhstan will also work with CARICC. 
 
9.     (SBU) Since 2006, roughly 1,000 officials from Central 
Asia and Afghanistan have been trained on various aspects of 
counternarcotics work through the NRC.  While Russia has been 
reluctant to pursue practical cooperation with NATO in many 
areas, this program has consistently stood out as an area 
where NATO and Russia can work together to achieve common 
objectives.  This joint training initiative is one of the 
most practical and useful of the Council's various 
activities.  The Russian training center at Domodedovo 
Airport is an important, but not principal, forum for 
providing training.  Russia has asked the U.S. to encourage 
Afghan drug enforcement personnel to train at Domodedovo. 
While the U.S. is supportive of the training, whether to send 
Afghan Police agents for counternarcotics training at 
Domodedovo is a decision for the Afghanistan Ministry of 
Interior. 
 
--------------------------------------------- ------ 
U.S. Support for Russia's Anti-narcotics Activities 
--------------------------------------------- ------ 
 
10.   (SBU) The U.S. government provides foreign assistance 
to expand Russia's ability to combat narcotics trafficking, 
especially along Afghan drug routes, reduce drug abuse, and 
increase access to drug prevention and treatment facilities 
for those at risk of or infected by HIV/AIDS, the majority of 
whom are injecting drug users.  The U.S. has contributed at 
least $100,000 for several years for direct participation of 
DEA trainers at the Domodedovo training center and $2.8 
million to support CARICC.  Programs like those of the 
Healthy Russia Foundation, a Russian NGO funded by State's 
Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement and 
USAID, contribute to preventing drug abuse by Russian youth, 
by raising awareness, knowledge, and understanding on drug 
use prevention and mitigating risks of contracting HIV/AIDS. 
With support from USAID, the Healthy Russia Foundation is 
also working to help expand the spectrum of
 drug treatment 
services available and to improve the treatment outcomes in 
select facilities in St. Petersburg and Orenburg. 
 
------- 
Comment 
------- 
 
11.   (SBU) The Drug Trafficking Working Group provides an 
opportunity to establish constructive relationships leading 
to real cooperation and information exchanges to further the 
interests of the U.S. and Russia in fighting the Afghan 
heroin trade and the scourge of drug addiction in Russia. 
Director Ivanov, as the head of FSKN and the State 
Anti-narcotics Committee, has broad authority over Russia's 
domestic drug treatment and demand reduction policies and its 
drug enforcement operations domestically and internationally. 
 While he appears open to discussing drug courts and other 
approaches to dealing with the problems of drug addiction in 
Russia, it is not yet clear whether he is prepared to offer 
significant operational and intelligence cooperation to the 
U.S. for combating the Afghan heroin trade.  Progress toward 
 
MOSCOW 00000226  004 OF 004 
 
 
this objective would be a significant outcome of your visit. 
I look forward to welcoming you to Moscow February 3. 
 
 
 
 
Beyrle

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10MOSCOW218, INQUIRY DELIVERED: QUARTERLY STRATEGIC DATA (SDX)

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Reference ID Created Released Classification Origin
10MOSCOW218 2010-01-29 11:52 2011-08-30 01:44 UNCLASSIFIED//FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY Embassy Moscow

VZCZCXYZ0011
RR RUEHWEB

DE RUEHMO #0218 0291152
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
R 291152Z JAN 10
FM AMEMBASSY MOSCOW
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC 6089
INFO RUEHGV/USMISSION GENEVA 0015

UNCLAS MOSCOW 000218 
 
SENSITIVE 
SIPDIS 
 
DEPARTMENT FOR VCI 
GENEVA FOR SFO DELEGATION 
 
E.O. 12958: N/A 
TAGS: KACT KTIA PARM START US RS
SUBJECT: INQUIRY DELIVERED: QUARTERLY STRATEGIC DATA (SDX) 
NOTIFICATION 
 
REF: STATE 9093 
 
(U) On January 29 we delivered reftel inquiry to MFA DVBR 
Second Secretary Andrey Malugin, who said he would pass this 
to MFA DVBR Director Anatoliy Antonov. 
Beyrle

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10MOSCOW206, ELEVATING REQUEST FOR PACE ELECTION OBSERVERS

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Reference ID Created Released Classification Origin
10MOSCOW206 2010-01-29 06:32 2011-08-30 01:44 UNCLASSIFIED//FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY Embassy Moscow

VZCZCXRO0981
PP RUEHIK
DE RUEHMO #0206 0290632
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
P 290632Z JAN 10
FM AMEMBASSY MOSCOW
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC PRIORITY 6077
INFO RUCNMEM/EU MEMBER STATES COLLECTIVE PRIORITY
RUEHZL/EUROPEAN POLITICAL COLLECTIVE PRIORITY
RUEHXD/MOSCOW POLITICAL COLLECTIVE PRIORITY

UNCLAS MOSCOW 000206 
 
SENSITIVE 
SIPDIS 
 
E.O. 12958: N/A 
TAGS: KDEM PREL COE RS
SUBJECT: ELEVATING REQUEST FOR PACE ELECTION OBSERVERS 
 
REF: A. MOSCOW 205 
     B. SECSTATE 7158 
 
(SBU)  In addition to REF A, post delivered REF B request to 
State Duma International Relations Committee Chairman and 
Russian PACE delegation head Konstantin Kosachev and to 
Russian MFA Director for General European Cooperation 
Vladimir Voronkov.  While the GOR will give the request 
serious consideration, both of these offices were skeptical 
that they could meet the January 30 deadline. 
Beyrle

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10MOSCOW200, DEMARCHE DELIVERED TO GOR ON HELIUM-3 SHORTAGE FOR

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Reference ID Created Released Classification Origin
10MOSCOW200 2010-01-28 11:38 2011-08-30 01:44 UNCLASSIFIED//FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY Embassy Moscow

VZCZCXYZ0001
RR RUEHWEB

DE RUEHMO #0200 0281138
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
R 281138Z JAN 10
FM AMEMBASSY MOSCOW
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC 6072
INFO RUEHII/VIENNA IAEA POSTS COLLECTIVE

UNCLAS MOSCOW 000200 
 
SENSITIVE 
SIPDIS 
 
ISN/MNSA FOR JSANBORN, ISN/NESS FOR BPLAPP AND ZNAZARIO 
 
E.O. 12958: N/A 
TAGS: AORC ENRG IAEA KNNP PARM RS
SUBJECT: DEMARCHE DELIVERED TO GOR ON HELIUM-3 SHORTAGE FOR 
IAEA SAFEGUARDS 
 
REF: A. A. SECSTATE 3312 
     B. B. YOUNG-LOCHBRYN EMAIL 1/16/10 
 
SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED 
 
1. (SBU) Post delivered reftel demarche orally to Aleksey 
Ubeyev, Deputy Director of International Cooperation 
Department, at Rosatom on January 14. After consulting with 
the Department (ref B), post delivered slightly abridged 
written talking points also to Ubeyev on Jan 19.  As Ubeyev 
is currently out of the country, post followed up with 
Rosatom contact Aleksandr Zhgutov, Director of Office of 
Relations with International Organizations, (one level below 
Ubeyev) on January 22.  Zhgutov informed us that Rosatom is 
"working on the issue".  He noted that Olli Heinonen, Deputy 
Director General of IAEA, visited Rosatom in mid-January and 
raised the Helium-3 shortage issue. Post will continue to 
follow up. 
Beyrle

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10MOSCOW189, Russian Deputy Health Minister Wants Expanded Health

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Reference ID Created Released Classification Origin
10MOSCOW189 2010-01-27 12:32 2011-08-30 01:44 UNCLASSIFIED//FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY Embassy Moscow

VZCZCXRO9226
PP RUEHAST RUEHDBU RUEHDH RUEHHM RUEHLN RUEHMA RUEHPB RUEHPOD RUEHSK
RUEHSL RUEHTRO RUEHVK RUEHYG
DE RUEHMO #0189/01 0271232
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
P 271232Z JAN 10
FM AMEMBASSY MOSCOW
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC PRIORITY 6060
INFO RUEHVK/AMCONSUL VLADIVOSTOK PRIORITY 3460
RUEHYG/AMCONSUL YEKATERINBURG PRIORITY 3802
RUEHLN/AMCONSUL ST PETERSBURG PRIORITY 5589
RUCNCIS/CIS COLLECTIVE PRIORITY
RUEHXD/MOSCOW POLITICAL COLLECTIVE PRIORITY
RUEHZN/ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY COLLECTIVE PRIORITY
RHEHNSC/NSC WASHDC PRIORITY
RUEAUSA/DEPT OF HHS WASHINGTON DC PRIORITY
RUEHC/DEPT OF LABOR WASHDC PRIORITY
RULSDMK/DEPT OF TRANSPORTATION WASHDC PRIORITY
RUEHPH/CDC ATLANTA GA PRIORITY
RUCPDOC/DEPT OF COMMERCE WASHDC PRIORITY
RUEHRC/USDA FAS WASHDC PRIORITY

UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 04 MOSCOW 000189 
 
SENSITIVE 
SIPDIS 
AIDAC 
 
DEPT FOR EUR/RUS, EUR/PGI, OES/PCI, OES/IHB 
OES/FO FOR CARTER-FOSTER 
STATE PLEASE PASS TO NAS, NSF, AND USAID 
USAID FOR GH, E&E 
HHS FOR OGHA 
HHS PLEASE PASS TO NIH AND FDA 
USDA FOR FAS/OSTA FOR MACKE 
DOL FOR ILAB 
 
E.O. 12958: N/A 
TAGS: TBIO PREL EAID SOCI KHIV TSPL ETRD ELAB EAGR KIPR
RS 
 
SUBJECT: Russian Deputy Health Minister Wants Expanded Health 
Cooperation 
 
REF: 09 MOSCOW 2978 
 
MOSCOW 00000189  001.2 OF 004 
 
 
SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED -- PLEASE PROTECT ACCORDINGLY. 
 
1. (SBU) SUMMARY:  In their upbeat December 14 meeting, Russian 
Deputy Health Minister Veronika Skvortsova and Ambassador Beyrle 
agreed that the Bilateral Presidential Commission's Working Group on 
Health should promote a substantial expansion of cooperation on 
health and medical sciences.  They concurred that it would be 
effective to create sub-groups to work on a few high-priority areas 
including cardiovascular diseases, healthy lifestyles, preventive 
medicine, road safety, and information technology applications. 
Skvortsova asked for detailed information on current National 
Institutes of Health (NIH) grants to Russian partners so that she 
could seek comparable Russian co-funding.  Ambassador Beyrle noted 
and Skvortsova acknowledged that USAID and MOHSD are preparing a new 
cooperation document which would expand the existing partnership in 
several areas.  After the Ambassador raised serious U.S. concerns 
regarding pending Russian regulations on pork and poultry 
processing, Skvortsova said that she is interested in studying the 
available research demonstrating the safety of chlorine in poultry 
processing.  She indicated that her ministry would participate in 
the Agriculture Working Group of the Bilateral Commission if 
invited, so that U.S. and Russian scientists could cooperate on food 
safety issues.  When the Ambassador raised concern over rumors that 
a revision of the pharmaceuticals law by the Ministry of Health and 
Social Development (MOHSD) does not include intellectual property 
rights provisions required for WTO accession, Skvortsova only 
acknowledged that there are different versions being drafted by both 
her Ministry and the Ministry of Economic Development.  END 
SUMMARY. 
 
LAUNCHING THE HEALTH WORKING GROUP 
---------------------------------- 
 
2. (U) On December 14, Ambassador Beyrle met with Deputy Minister of 
Health and Social Development Veronika Skvortsova and an interagency 
gathering of Russian health officials to agree on an agenda for 
cooperation under the Health Working Group of the U.S.-Russia 
Bilateral Presidential Commission.  The discussion built upon two 
earlier meetings in late November and early December in which 
Skvortsova and officials of NIH and the Centers for Disease Control 
and Prevention (CDC) had defined areas of mutual interest for joint 
work (reftel) and continued dialogue with USAID and its implementing 
partners.  In response to a proposal on areas of collaboration that 
MOHSD gave to the Embassy at the end of September, the Ambassador 
presented both a U.S.-drafted expanded table of proposed areas of 
cooperation and a concrete list of U.S. proposals for cooperation 
activities for the immediate future.  He also handed Skvortsova a 
letter from Assistant Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) 
Howard Koh, inviting her to visit HHS during a planned trip to the 
United States in late February.  (N???: Skvortsova, a specialist in 
stroke research, plans to attend an international stroke conference 
in San Antonio, Texas, on February 23.  Post's health working group 
will follow up directly with MOHSD's International Department and 
HHS to arrange this and other meetings as appropriate.  END NOTE.) 
The Ambassador explained that Dr. Koh hoped to visit Moscow March 
10-11 to lead the U.S. side for the first meeting of the Health 
Working Group. 
 
3. (SBU) To help activate cooperation, the Ambassador suggested 
forming expert sub-groups on cardiovascular diseases and healthy 
lifestyles, which are high priorities for both countries. 
Skvortsova endorsed the suggestion and countered with a proposal to 
establish additional sub-groups on preventive medicine, information 
technology and telemedicine, and road safety.  She also expressed 
 
MOSCOW 00000189  002.2 OF 004 
 
 
interest in continuing the existing U.S.-Russia collaboration in 
developing countries under the Bratislava
 Initiative, which USAID 
has been facilitating.  She informed the Ambassador that MOHSD, in 
partnership with USAID and host government counterparts in third 
countries, had selected nine experts to take part in joint field 
work on HIV, tuberculosis, and other diseases of global importance 
in the past year, and agreed that this work could be extended.  The 
Ambassador noted preparations for a new cooperation document between 
USAID and MOHSD, planned for 2010, which will build upon and expand 
joint activities. 
 
AN EMPHATIC "YES" TO COOPERATION ON LABOR ISSUES 
--------------------------------------------- --- 
 
4. (SBU) The Ambassador informed Skvortsova that the U.S. Department 
of Labor is interested in possible cooperation with MOHSD on 
workplace health and safety, mine safety, and employment for the 
disabled.  Skvortsova responded emphatically that the Ministry is 
interested in cooperating on these issues.  She said that Natalya 
Zharova, head of the Ministry's Department of Wages, Occupational 
Safety, and Social Partnerships, would be responsible for this 
cooperation.  (NOTE: We conveyed Skvortsova's interest to Department 
of Labor officials in December and will follow up with them to 
discuss next steps for cooperation on these issues.  END NOTE.) 
 
RUSSIA READY TO CO-FUND MEDICAL RESEARCH 
---------------------------------------- 
 
5. (SBU) The Ambassador called Russia's taxation of research grants 
an obstacle to expanding cooperation.  Skvortsova said that she is 
pleased that U.S.-Russian scientific interaction is growing and said 
that Russia is interested in co-funding research projects on an 
equal basis.  This would obviate the need to obtain tax exemption 
for grants by having Russian partners funded from Russian sources. 
She cited the model of Russia-EU cooperation on biomedical research, 
which is implemented jointly with the Ministry of Education and 
Science (MES).  She noted that she had already discussed the idea 
with MES Minister Andrey Fursenko, whose agency is responsible for 
approving research grants, including in biomedical sciences. 
 
6. (SBU) Skvortsova recommended that joint research projects link 
institutions, rather than individual scientists.  She asked that the 
Embassy provide detailed information about current NIH grants to 
Russian scientists so that her Ministry may determine the most 
promising areas for joint research in time to amend the 2010 federal 
budget.  The Ambassador agreed to provide more information, but he 
urged that the working groups should expand joint work into new 
areas and new activities, not replace or obstruct existing 
partnerships.  Skvortsova agreed with that approach, saying that the 
working group "should not change relations between scientists and 
specialists," that it should "expand and deepen interaction" and 
"add a new quality to the work."  She clarified that she would need 
to ask Minister Fursenko about funding. 
 
7. (SBU) NOTE: Following on Skvortsova's December 1 meeting with NIH 
representatives, the Embassy had already forwarded general 
information on the overall volume of NIH grants to Russian partners 
and the subjects of the research, but without naming specific 
grantees.  We continue to follow up with NIH to provide additional 
information as appropriate.  Some potential U.S. partners have 
voiced concern that interagency rivalries on the Russian side might 
cause disruption of ongoing programs if the programs are brought to 
the Ministry's attention in this way.  In an example of such a 
rivalry, the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, which is primarily 
responsible for international cooperation on biomedical sciences, 
submitted proposals for bilateral science cooperation to MOHSD, 
 
MOSCOW 00000189  003.2 OF 004 
 
 
according to our contacts at the Academy, but the Ministry did not 
include them in its list of proposed activities.  END NOTE. 
 
ADDRESSING CONCERNS ON POULTRY PROCESSING 
----------------------------------------- 
 
8. (SBU) The Ambassador expressed serious concern that proposed 
Russian restrictions on chlorine use and antibiotics, together with 
zero tolerances for naturally occurring bacteria, which were set to 
go into effect on December 15, would effectively shut down $400 
million in annual U.S. pork trade and threatened to close down an 
additional $700 million in poultry trade as of January 1, 2010.  The 
Ambassador passed Skvortsova a packet of scientific reports 
demonstrating the safety of chlorine use. 
 
9. (SBU) Skvortsova reminded the Ambassador that food safety is 
regulated by the Ministry's Department of Health Protection and 
Epidemiological Well-Being, as well as by the Federal Service for 
Surveillance for Consumer Rights Protection and Human Well-Being 
(Rospotrebnadzor).  Representatives of both agencies were present at 
the meeting.  Skvortsova said that Russia had carried out its own 
studies in this area and remained concerned about the toxicity of 
chlorine and its potential to cause cancer.  Also, she said, Russia 
had found a possible link between residual antibiotics on food 
products and drug resistance in humans, and the government is 
responsible for protecting the public against such effects.  She 
noted that harmless chemical treatment methods are available for 
poultry and meat processing, but that it would also be useful to 
study available data on the effects of chlorine and antibiotics and 
cooperate on further research.  She said she would discuss the issue 
with the MOHSD departments concerned, as well as with 
Rospotrebnadzor and the Ministry of Agriculture.  A USDA-USTR 
delegation visited Russia January 18-21 to discuss the issue 
directly with Rospotrebnadzor (septel). 
 
10. (SBU) The Ambassador asked Dr. Skvortsova whether an MOHSD 
representative could participate in the Working Group on Agriculture 
under the Bilateral Presidential Commission, so that U.S. and 
Russian scientists might cooperate more closely on food safety 
concerns.  Skvortsova responded that MOHSD would participate if 
invited to do so. 
 
DATA EXCLUSIVITY IN PHARMACEUTICAL LAW 
-------------------------------------- 
 
11. (SBU) The Ambassador raised U.S. concerns regarding intellectual 
property rights (IPR) protection in the current draft of a new "Law 
on the Circulation of Medicines."  The current draft does not 
include a provision for six years of data exclusivity, to which 
Russia committed in the November 2006 Bilateral Agreement ("side 
letter") on IPR as a condition for its accession to the World Trade 
Organization (WTO).  Skvortsova stated that there are in fact two 
draft laws in question: an amendment to the Law on Medicines 
developed by the Ministry of Economic Development (MED) and 
submitted to the government in 2008, and new draft legislation 
developed by MOHSD in 2009 that would replace Russia's existing Law 
on Medicines to regulate all stages of the drug industry in Russia. 
When the Ambassador pointed out that MOHSD's
 draft Law on 
Circulation of Medicines does not include the data exclusivity 
provisions, Skvortsova responded: "Both versions will go to the 
Duma, and we shall see what results."  (NOTE: MOHSD's draft took 
precedent and went to the Duma on December 26.  The MED data 
exclusivity amendments have not yet been presented.  The Duma's 
Health Committee is taking industry comments until January 25. 
Industry is working to submit comments to the committee on time. 
End Note). 
 
MOSCOW 00000189  004.2 OF 004 
 
 
 
POLICY EXCHANGE ON HEALTHCARE REFORM 
------------------------------------ 
 
12. (SBU) At the conclusion of the meeting, at Skvortsova's request, 
the Ambassador gave a summary of the latest developments in U.S. 
healthcare reform.  Skvortsova listened intently and asked the 
Ambassador why the proposed reforms are so controversial.  She 
acknowledged the extreme complexity of the issues in play and said 
that she would be interested in further discussions of the reform 
process as it continues. 
 
13. (SBU) COMMENT: This third meeting between Dr. Skvortsova and 
U.S. officials in less than a month further demonstrated the Health 
Ministry's strong interest in revitalizing cooperation with the 
United States, as well as the close alignment of our interests in 
this area.  Although we have not yet met with Minister of Health and 
Social Development Tatyana Golikova herself, the meetings with 
Skvortsova have nonetheless been highly productive, as Skvortsova is 
a career health professional with a strong personal interest in 
advancing these issues. 
 
BEYRLE

Wikileaks

10MOSCOW72, MOSCOW STATE UNIVERSITY’S SCIENCE PARK SUCCESSFUL IN

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Reference ID Created Released Classification Origin
10MOSCOW72 2010-01-14 11:04 2011-08-30 01:44 UNCLASSIFIED//FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY Embassy Moscow

VZCZCXRO7819
RR RUEHAST RUEHDBU RUEHDH RUEHHM RUEHLN RUEHMA RUEHPB RUEHPOD RUEHSL
RUEHTM RUEHTRO RUEHVK RUEHYG
DE RUEHMO #0072/01 0141104
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
R 141104Z JAN 10
FM AMEMBASSY MOSCOW
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC 5917
INFO RUEHXD/MOSCOW POLITICAL COLLECTIVE
RHMFIUU/DEPT OF ENERGY WASHINGTON DC
RUEKJCS/SECDEF WASHDC
RUCPDOC/DEPT OF COMMERCE WASHDC
RUEHLN/AMCONSUL ST PETERSBURG 5579
RUEHYG/AMCONSUL YEKATERINBURG 3794
RUEHVK/AMCONSUL VLADIVOSTOK 3448
RUEHZN/ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY COLLECTIVE
RUEHRC/USDA FAS WASHDC
RUEAUSA/DEPT OF HHS WASHINGTON DC
RUCPDOC/DEPT OF COMMERCE WASHINGTON DC
RUEHPH/CDC ATLANTA GA
RHEHNSC/NSC WASHDC
RUEAEPA/HQ EPA WASHDC
RUEHC/DEPT OF INTERIOR WASHDC
RHFJBRQ/NSF POLAR WASHINGTON DC
RUEAFCC/FCC WASHDC

UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 04 MOSCOW 000072 
 
SIPDIS 
SENSITIVE 
 
DEPT FOR OES/OA, OES/STC, OES/PCI, OES/SAT, EUR/ACE, EUR/RUS, 
EUR/PGI, EUR/PRA, ISN/CTR 
OSTP FOR HOLDREN, ROLF 
STATE PLEASE PASS TO NASA, USAID, AND NSF 
HHS PLEASE PASS TO NIH and CDC 
USPTO FOR LAMM 
 
E.O. 12958: N/A 
TAGS: TSPL TNGD TBIO TINT KIPR KPAO OEXC SCUL SOCI PGOV
ECON, RS 
 
SUBJECT: MOSCOW STATE UNIVERSITY'S SCIENCE PARK SUCCESSFUL IN 
PROMOTING INNOVATION 
 
REFS: A) 09 Moscow 2885, B) 09 Moscow 2782, C) 09 Moscow 0333 
 
MOSCOW 00000072  001.2 OF 004 
 
 
Sensitive but Unclassified; Not for Internet Distribution 
 
1.  (SBU) Summary:  Over the past five years, Moscow State 
University's (MSU) Science Park has launched 85 high-tech start-up, 
mostly in the IT and biotech fields.  Raising awareness of the 
importance of IPR protection is a key MSU priority.  With its 
science park and other innovative activities, MSU is at the 
forefront of President Medvedev's efforts to increase innovation by 
commercializing research and producing the skilled high-tech 
specialists needed to modernize Russia's economy.  Even though they 
do not have MSU's powerful high-tech cluster or political clout, 
other universities and scientific institutes are still optimistic 
that they will be able to take good advantage of an August 2009 law 
that permits them commercialize research results by establishing 
small innovative enterprises.  End Summary. 
 
2.  (SBU) On December 10, Environment, Science and Technology, and 
Health section staff and Post's Intellectual Property Attache joined 
a visiting U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) attorney on a 
visit to MSU's Science Park.  Established in 1992 with initial 
funding from the university, Ministry of Science (precursor to the 
Ministry of Education and Science), and private sources, MSU's 
Science Park is a joint stock company that stimulates innovation at 
MSU and in the Moscow region by helping MSU's 5000 students and 
scientists (including 170 Russian Academy of Sciences academicians) 
start businesses based on technologies developed at MSU.  The oldest 
of Russia's approximately 50 science parks, the MSU Science Park now 
brings in enough income from rent and its services to be fully 
self-sustaining.  However, both MSU Rector Sadovnichiy and Minister 
of Education and Science Fursenko remain on its Board of Directors. 
Its 2.5 acre campus includes an Information Technology Center and 
eight smaller buildings in which 2,500 employees work in 
approximately 45 high tech companies (60 percent in IT/software and 
40 percent in telecom, biotech/ecology and new materials).  Several 
MSU Science Park companies are well-known and profitable, including 
the DEC software center, REDLAB (part of Sun Microsystems), GARANT 
(producer of Russian legislation databases), Intelligent Security 
Systems, and three of Russia's most popular search engines: RAMBLER, 
APPORT, and NIGMA. 
 
--------------------------------------------- ------ 
Two MSU Successes: Nanocatalysts and Influenza Drug 
--------------------------------------------- ------ 
 
3.  (SBU) During a brief tour, Oleg Movsesyan, Science Park Chief 
Executive Officer, explained that MSU actively reaches out to 
prospective clients interested in launching high tech companies. 
MSU Science Park employees provide clients with information, 
training, fundraising support, advice in business plan development 
and IP protection, and even assistance in finding investment at 
every developmental stage, from idea to start-up.  Companies do not 
pay fees for services rendered until they have officially formed. 
The Science Park boasts impressive results; it has accepted 197 
applications since 2004 and helped give life to 85 new start-ups 
(not all choose to rent office space on the premises) with an 
average turnover of $300,000.  Movsesyan highlighted a September 
2009 investment of $10 million by the Russian Corporation for 
Nanotechnologies (Rusnano) and Russian Venture Fund (RVS) into 
"Start-Catalisator," a small start-up launched in 2006, for testing 
and prototype development of nanocatalyst devices for cleaner 
associated gas in oil fields.  Movsesyan lauded MSU Science Park 
start-up "MolTech Ltd" for winning first prize in Russia's 2008 
 
MOSCOW 00000072  002.2 OF 004 
 
 
Innovation Convention for designing a pharmaceutical drug called 
"Grippaverin," that mitigates influenza symptoms and is currently on 
sale in the Russian market.  (Note:  We visited a few ph
armacies, 
but were unable to find Grippaverin.  End note.) 
 
--------------------------------------------- -- 
Nano Education and Innovation Activities at MSU 
--------------------------------------------- -- 
 
4.  (SBU) MSU Science Vice-Rector Aleksey Khokhlov explained that 
MSU's technology cluster includes the Science Park, supercomputer, 
Institute of Carbonic Materials and Technologies, Center of Natural 
Resources, BioIncubator, and a new Nano Research and Educational 
Center.  Earlier that day, Khokhlov noted that he had attended the 
opening ceremony of MSU's new 500-teraflop supercomputer, which he 
claimed was the seventh fastest in the world and second fastest in 
Europe.  (Note: Press reports after President Medvedev's November 25 
visit to the supercomputer said it ranks 12th in the world.  End 
note.)  With more than $15 million investment from the university 
and the government, MSU is currently constructing a 
3000-square-meter Biotech Incubator building.  With twenty 
applications already pending, Science Park officials expect the 
BioIncubator to open in 2010 and produce up to ten start-ups per 
year from 2011 onward. 
 
5.  (SBU) Khokhlov emphasized that MSU can only realize its three 
key missions--education, research and innovation--by developing new 
multidisciplinary educational programs, such as in nanotechnologies. 
 Therefore, in 2008, MSU opened its Educational and Research Center 
on Nanotechnologies with courses available to fourth- and fifth-year 
students.  Selected faculty from the departments of Physics, 
Chemistry, Biology, Material Science, Bioengineering and 
Biocomputing, and Fundamental Medicine teach courses in three 
specializations: nanosystems and nanodevices, functional 
nanomaterials, and nanobiomaterials and nanobiotechnologies. 
According to Khokhlov, the NanoCenter will prepare approximately 50 
students per year for careers in Russia's growing nano industry. 
 
6.  (SBU) Beginning in February 2010, MSU will select 25 students 
for a Rusnano-sponsored program at MSU that will allow private 
companies to share the costs of training nanospecialists.  Khokhlov 
noted that this is similar to the U.S. private sector's funding for 
graduate students.  A December 2008 MSU-Rusnano cooperative 
agreement will pay for a modern MSU Innovation Center of 
Nanotechnology that will train nanospecialists for MSU's existing 
Nano Educational and Research Center, provide Rusnano with 
specialists in the project expertise stage, and involve MSU 
laboratories in Rusnano's certification process. 
 
7.  (SBU) Even with the financial crisis, Movsesyan was optimistic 
that the Science Park can continue incubating 20-25 start-ups per 
year.  However, he and his colleagues commented that the 
entrepreneurial spirit is less developed in Russia than in the 
United States because "Russian investors are hesitant to take risks 
on innovative projects without proof that new products will work." 
Movsesyan noted that the August 2, 2009 law allowing universities to 
commercialize technology should enable the Science Park to increase 
the involvement of scientific leaders and MSU department heads in 
small business development.  (Comment:  Neither Movsesyan nor his 
legal staff were able to explain us how the Science Park operated 
during the period from the mid-nineties until 2009 when universities 
were not allowed to have small businesses.  Legal experts have told 
us that the Russian government granted MSU special permission to 
establish its Science Park due to the influence of its many 
 
MOSCOW 00000072  003.2 OF 004 
 
 
prominent scientists.  Deputy Minister of Education and Science 
Vladimir Miklushevskiy told the press in 2009 that 187 universities 
would launch 2,500 enterprises, providing jobs for as many as 30,000 
graduates.  Although other universities have been optimistic with us 
that they will be able to use this new law to good advantage, they 
do not have MSU's political clout or relatively robust warchest.  In 
October 2009, Aleksandr Suvorinov, Head of Department of Innovation 
Development and Technology Commercialization, Federal Agency for 
Science and Innovations, credited the bilateral Innovation Council 
on High Technologies (ICHT) recommendations with shaping the law, 
particularly allowing universities to create small businesses.  The 
law was somewhat controversial, with Senator Nikolay Ryzhkov 
comparing it to the law in the early nineties that allowed 
universities to create commercial organizations.  "Half the 
oligarchs whose names you're always hearing are a result of that 
law," said Ryzhkov.  "It's the single most corrupt law and allows 
for everything we create with state money to be pumped dry."  End 
Comment.) 
 
---------------------------------- 
Technology Transfer and IPR Issues 
---------------------------------- 
 
8. (SBU) Movsesyan explained that Science Park staff makes 
significant efforts to raise IPR awareness.  The concept of 
safeguarding intellectual property is the first topic his 
consultants must explain to students and scientists, who often do 
not understand either the importance of protecting their work or 
that they "should not disseminate their ideas for free."  In 2004, 
MSU opened a Center for Technology Transfer which provides no cost 
assistance to scientists who want to commercialize research results. 
 Working closely with MSU's Science Park, the Tech Transfer office 
provides educational programs and information for MSU-based small 
companies and compiles databases of all MSU research results.  The 
MSU Tech Transfer Office provides services to protect IPR, 
functioning like similar offices at U.S. universities, whereas the 
Science Park focuses on the incubation of start-ups and creating 
favorable conditions for small enterprises.  Both institutions 
stated that rightholders in Russia experience problems with IP 
protection due to deficiencies in IP legislation, lack of clear 
procedures for civil litigation, and poor IP enforcement in general. 
 Even before Russia rehauled its IP legislation in 2008 by enacting 
Part IV of the Civil Code, Russian law allowed for both "exclusive" 
and "non-exclusive" licensing agreements.  Although rightholders 
have tended to license their IP via "non exclusive" contracts, 
Movsesyan commented that individual investors may in the future 
prefer to own their IP on an exclusive basis.  The Science Park 
offers courses on how to protect intellectual property rights, 
including the legal aspects of concluding exclusive licensing 
agreements. 
 
10. (SBU) Comment:  MSU has used its Science Park and the other 
elements of its innovative infrastructure and its unparalleled 
political clout and funding to create a comfortable environment to 
partner with innovative businesses, racking up some impressive 
results.  However, significant obstacles to innovation on a national 
scale remain.  Few universities have the funding to develop high 
tech clusters with the top-notch equipment, facilities, and staff 
that MSU offers.  President Medvedev is a strong suppo
rter of the 
National Education Project, begun in 2005, to increase Russia's 
global competitiveness by improving education.  If successful, it 
will go a long way toward improving innovation and addressing 
problems with brain drain.  But for Russia to become a global player 
in high tech, as President Medvedev exhorts, it must also do more to 
 
MOSCOW 00000072  004.2 OF 004 
 
 
improve the business environment, foster entrepreneurship, address 
deficiencies in IP legislation and enforcement, and expand 
innovative elements of infrastructure nationwide.  END COMMENT

Wikileaks

09MOSCOW3151, ISTC GOVERNING BOARD IN MOSCOW APPROVES WORKING

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Reference ID Created Released Classification Origin
09MOSCOW3151 2009-12-30 15:42 2011-08-30 01:44 UNCLASSIFIED//FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY Embassy Moscow

VZCZCXRO8218
PP RUEHAST RUEHDBU RUEHLN RUEHSK RUEHVK
DE RUEHMO #3151/01 3641542
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
P 301542Z DEC 09
FM AMEMBASSY MOSCOW
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC PRIORITY 5836
INFO RUEHTA/AMEMBASSY ASTANA PRIORITY 0372
RUEHEK/AMEMBASSY BISHKEK PRIORITY 2748
RUEHDBU/AMEMBASSY DUSHANBE PRIORITY 0086
RUEHKV/AMEMBASSY KYIV PRIORITY 0395
RUEHSK/AMEMBASSY MINSK PRIORITY 0001
RUEHNY/AMEMBASSY OSLO PRIORITY 1758
RUEHUL/AMEMBASSY SEOUL PRIORITY 2813
RUEHSI/AMEMBASSY TBILISI PRIORITY 3921
RUEHKO/AMEMBASSY TOKYO PRIORITY 4312
RUEHYE/AMEMBASSY YEREVAN PRIORITY 0550
RUEHAST/AMCONSUL ALMATY PRIORITY 0015
RUEHLN/AMCONSUL ST PETERSBURG PRIORITY 5566
RUEHVK/AMCONSUL VLADIVOSTOK PRIORITY 3437
RUEHBS/USEU BRUSSELS PRIORITY
RUEKJCS/SECDEF WASHDC PRIORITY
RHMFIUU/DEPT OF ENERGY WASHINGTON DC PRIORITY

UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 04 MOSCOW 003151 
 
SENSITIVE 
SIPDIS 
 
DEPARTMENT FOR ISN/CTR 
 
E.O. 12958: N/A 
TAGS: KNNP PARM TSPL RS
SUBJECT: ISTC GOVERNING BOARD IN MOSCOW APPROVES WORKING 
GROUP ON TRANSFORMATION; CELEBRATES 15 YEAR ANNIVERSARY 
AMID UNCERTAIN FUTURE 
 
 Sensitive but Unclassified ) please handle accordingly. 
 
------- 
SUMMARY 
------- 
 
1. (SBU) Amid continued uncertainty over its future, the 
International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) held 
Coordinating Committee (CC) and Governing Board (GB) 
meetings, and celebrated its fifteen-year anniversary 
December 7-10, 2009 in Moscow. The GB agreed to establish a 
working group, to be co-chaired by the U.S. and Russia, to 
discuss the future of the ISTC.  The main objective is to 
address Russian questions about the ISTC,s continuing 
relevance.  Arguing that its assistance legislation did not 
give it any flexibility, the European Union opposed U.S. 
language in a draft "joint statement" designed to alleviate 
Russian embarrassment over the existing ISTC Agreement,s 
implication that Russian scientists remain the same kind of 
proliferation threat they did in the early 1990's.  All 
participants were able to agree to weaker language that 
reiterated the December 2008 GB statement about the ISTC's 
success in meeting its original objective of redirecting 
former weapons scientists. 
 
2. (SBU) Secretary Clinton's congratulatory message at the 
December 10 celebration of the ISTC's 15th Anniversary, read 
by Ambassador Beyrle, sent a strong signal of U.S. 
sensitivity to Russian concerns and interest in developing a 
reinvigorated ISTC.  The U.S. Party led by Ambassador Bonnie 
Jenkins also held bilateral meetings with senior officials 
from the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, state nuclear 
power corporation Rosatom, and the four other Funding Parties 
of the ISTC.  The MFA, which opposes the ISTC in its current 
form, was pointedly absent from all of the week's official 
events.  END SUMMARY. 
 
3. (U) A U.S. delegation led by Coordinator for Cooperative 
Threat Reduction Programs Ambassador Bonnie Jenkins, and 
including Department, DOE, and Embassy officials, 
participated in the preparatory ISTC Coordinating Committee, 
a non-governmental organizations (NGO) Roundtable, the 
decision-making Governing Board, and Fifteenth Anniversary 
meetings in Moscow December 7-10, 2009.  U.S. GB member 
Victor Alessi and overall GB Chairman Ronald Lehman also 
played important roles in the meetings. 
 
------------------------------- 
Working Group on Transformation 
------------------------------- 
 
4. (SBU) At the CC meeting, the U.S. Party  put forward 
language that went beyond the December 2008 GB Statement 
recognizing the success of the ISTC in achieving its original 
mission of redirecting weapons scientists and proposing that 
a consultative process therefore be developed to discuss 
future options for the ISTC.  The European Union (EU) and 
Russian Party agreed in principle to establishing a 
consultative body but not to the statement as proposed. In 
pre-meeting discussions in Moscow, the EU representatives 
said that they had been unable to get clearance for the 
stronger language in a U.S.-proposed "joint statement" 
designed to allay Russian irritation over the existing ISTC 
Agreement's implication that Russian scientists still 
represent a serious proliferation threat. Such a statement, 
the EU argued, would undermine their legislation's 
justification for assisting Russia, a justification founded 
on the need to redirect Russian scientists. At the GB 
meeting, the Parties agreed to the related U.S. proposal to 
open consultations among the ISTC parties in order to find 
common ground on which to base a possibly transformed Center. 
 
MOSCOW 00003151  002 OF 004 
 
 
 Russian GB member Lev Ryabev suggested that a working group 
be established at which he would be able to present his 
"personal" views.  Accepting this idea, the GB Record of 
Decisions included the following: "The Board decided to set 
up a working party with a mandate to discuss options and to 
make proposals regarding the future of the ISTC including a 
possible review of the Agreement." The U.S. drafted Terms of 
Reference for the Working Group and received feedback from 
the other Parties. The Working Party will meet in Moscow in 
March and will be prepared to report to the GB at the next 
meeting in June. 
 
------------------------------------ 
Shifting U.S. Priorities at the ISTC 
------------------------------------ 
 
5. (U) The U.S. continues to focus its funding at the ISTC on 
projects that relate t
o nonproliferation cooperation, 
institutionalization of financial self-sustainability, and 
support of supplemental budget activities such as the 
Targeted Initiative on Biosecurity.  This is in line with our 
vision of a transformed ISTC that can be a platform for 
scientific cooperation among equal partners on areas of 
global importance, including nonproliferation ) in contrast 
to the existing, assistance-based mission centered on 
redirecting weapons scientists.  At the CC, the U.S. 
announced funding for a project to develop technologies to 
more effectively detect nuclear materials in cargo, an 
initiative on the prevention of biological threats, and an 
agreed framework to cooperate with Russia on high-intensity 
light research.  The U.S. also encouraged the Secretariat to 
continue to develop an initiative on nuclear forensics. 
 
 
-------------------------------------- 
Russian Perspectives on Future of ISTC 
-------------------------------------- 
 
6. (SBU) In discussions on the margins of the meetings, 
Rosatom representative and Russian GB member Lev Ryabev 
agreed to the U.S.-proposed consultations on the future of 
the ISTC.  Ryabev suggested a working group that he could 
attend as a member of the GB.  Ryabev said that all Russian 
stakeholders agreed that the ISTC had been a success and that 
the situation had changed dramatically since the ISTC was 
launched fifteen years ago. The point, consequently, was that 
there was no longer a nonproliferation threat from Russian 
scientists (a view that MFA representative Rozhkov strongly 
emphasized in a separate meeting*see para 10).  The 1992 
ISTC Agreement, in effect, labeled Russia a nonproliferation 
threat; this stigma represented a serious problem for the 
Russian government today.  Ryabev said there were varied 
points of view within the government on a future role in 
Russia for the ISTC.  Some proposals had been made, including 
that the ISTC be closed, but no final decisions yet reached. 
With the scientist redirection objective accomplished, the 
task now, in Ryabev's own view, was to define a new objective 
for the ISTC.  In a brief discussion with Ambassador Beyrle, 
he stressed that Russia would not agree to continue the ISTC 
for its own sake, but might be willing to support 
transformation in the context of demonstrating that it would 
add value for implementing new science projects of benefit to 
Russia.  The projects, not the ISTC, should be the starting 
point.  Rozhkov made similar points separately at the MFA. 
 
 
 
------------------------------------ 
Roundtable with NGO Representatives 
------------------------------------ 
 
 
MOSCOW 00003151  003 OF 004 
 
 
7. (SBU) In a roundtable hosted by Post, representatives from 
the Center for Policy Studies in Russia (PIR Center) and the 
Civilian Research and Development Foundation (CRDF)in Moscow 
met with Ambassador Jenkins to share views on the ISTC and 
Russian nonproliferation activities in general.  The PIR 
Board is composed of many well-known Russian and U.S. 
nonproliferation experts, including Anatoly Antonov, Nikolay 
Spassiky, and Rose Gottemoeller. The Russian PIR 
representative stated that the ISTC was perceived very 
differently among various parties in Russia, from very 
positive to not so positive.  In this context, he referenced 
other initiatives dating back to Gorbachev times and how many 
of those had been forgotten. 
 
8. (SBU) In the context of discussing transitioning the ISTC 
from an assistance-based organization to one based on 
partnership, the representative for the Civilian Research and 
Development Foundation (CRDF) in Moscow stated "technical 
assistance is a necessary part of partnership", that 
partnership should not replace technical assistance in 
relations between Russia and the U.S., and that any 
transition should be conducted over a period of several 
years. In separate informal meetings, the representative from 
PIR agreed to explore the possibility of hosting a roundtable 
among government representatives and nonproliferation experts 
in Russia on the future of the ISTC. 
 
------------------------------------ 
ISTC CELEBRATES 15 YEARS OF SUCCESS 
----------------------------------- 
9. (U) A December 10 day devoted to celebration of the ISTC's 
15th anniversary drew hundreds of past and present 
participants in its programs.  Due attention was given to a 
review of the scientific achievements of the ISTC over the 
past 15 years.  The key sentiment expressed by 
representatives of Russian and other former Soviet Union 
scientific institutions was gratitude for ISTC assistance at 
a critical time for their countries.  Ambassador Beyrle, an 
engaged supporter of the ISTC, read a congratulatory message 
from Secretary Clinton. It gave a strong endorsement to the 
work of the ISTC and acknowledged that the challenge it had 
been originally designed for has been met, but also 
recognized its potential to make new contributions and 
expressed U.S. interest in making the ISTC a "nexus for 
renewed and refocused engagement" with scientists of the FSU 
and perhaps beyond.  In  discussions with Beyrle and his 
staff, Jenkins reviewed the options Washington felt the ISTC 
faced: possible improvements under the existing Agreement, 
more sweeping transformation under a review ) including 
possible amendment ) of the Agreement, termination of the 
ISTC in favor of other, admittedly less capable, instruments 
of scientific cooperation, if that became necessary.  Beyrle 
noted the Embassy's misgivings about an approach that might 
reopen the existing Agreement, citing the danger that the 
existing tax and other privileges could be lost in the 
process.  Separately, all of the ISTC funding partners 
expressed similar concerns, while noting it would be 
difficult to avoid this issue. 
 
--------------------------------------------- ----------- 
Ambassador Jenkins' Bilateral Meetings with ROSATOM and MFA 
--------------------------------------------- ----------- 
 
10. (SBU) Ambassador Bonnie Jenkins also raised the G-8 
Global Partnership and the Nuclear Summit in meetings with 
MFA and Rosatom officials.  MFA Deputy Director, DVBR 
(Security and Disarmement Department), Oleg Rozhkov noted 
that he was pleased with the pre-Tokyo text of the Nuclear 
Summit Work Plan and could accept most of the language, while 
reiterating the position laid out in Rome that the Russians 
have no redlines on GP geographic expansion but do want 
 
MOSCOW 00003151  004 OF 004 
 
 
assurance that existing commitments will be fulfilled and 
clarity on the amount of additional funds to be made 
available. He noted that the Summit should be focused and not 
distracted by other issues that other countries might raise 
and that, in agreement with a statement by Beyrle, Russia 
should have a prominent role in the Summit. Rozhkov opined 
that ISTC's mission in Russia was completed, and it would do 
better to pursue non-proliferation objectives elsewhere. In 

response to Amb. Jenkin's suggestion that the two countries 
initiate a dialogue on the future of the ISTC, he said it 
would be useful to discuss how fruitfully to use ISTC's 
current assets in other countries.  Any future for ISTC in 
Russia would depend on identifying new programs first and 
then demonstrating the usefulness of ISTC for implementing 
them. 
 
11.  (SBU) For Rosatom's part, Deputy Director General 
Spasskiy told Ambassador Jenkins he worried that a full 
nonproliferation schedule of activities between January and 
the Nuclear Summit will result in rushed decision making on 
GP issues.  Spasskiy said that Russian nonproliferation 
priorities are, in order, START, CTBT, and the 123 Agreement. 
He also stated that the Nuclear Summit "cannot be a seminar" 
and that "it has to be a summit" and that the entire process 
should be carefully prepared and orchestrated so as to not 
upstage the NPT Review Conference.  Regarding ISTC, Spasskiy 
said both ISTC's goals and economic privileges in Russia 
belonged to an earlier time.  On the way forward, it would be 
important to protect both the pipeline of ISTC projects and 
our cooperation. 
Rubin

Wikileaks

09MOSCOW3091, ENGAGING MUSLIM POPULATION ON “DEFAMATION OF

WikiLeaks Link

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Reference ID Created Released Classification Origin
09MOSCOW3091 2009-12-23 14:44 2011-08-30 01:44 UNCLASSIFIED//FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY Embassy Moscow

VZCZCXRO4166
RR RUEHDBU RUEHLN RUEHPOD RUEHVK RUEHYG
DE RUEHMO #3091 3571444
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
R 231444Z DEC 09
FM AMEMBASSY MOSCOW
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC 5765
INFO RUEHXD/MOSCOW POLITICAL COLLECTIVE
RHEHNSC/NSC WASHDC

UNCLAS MOSCOW 003091 
 
SENSITIVE 
SIPDIS 
 
E.O. 12958: N/A 
TAGS: PREL PGOV PHUM SOCI RS
SUBJECT: ENGAGING MUSLIM POPULATION ON "DEFAMATION OF 
RELIGION" 
 
REF: A. A) STATE 128320 
     B. B) MOSCOW 2708 
 
1. (SBU) In response to ref A request, Post has produced a 
plan of action for engaging both the GOR and Russia's Muslim 
population with the goal of ending support for the 
Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC)'s "defamation of 
religion" resolutions in the United Nations.  During our 
October meeting with Natalia Zolotova of the MFA's Department 
of Human Rights and Humanitarian Cooperation (ref B), we 
pointed out that these resolutions provide a disturbingly 
vague definition of the terms "defamation" and "religion," 
and expressed the concern that they could become a crude tool 
in the hands of any government inclined to suppress freedom 
of speech.  Although she told us that the GOR did not intend 
to change its position on the UNGA "defamation of religion" 
resolution, Zolotova received our points with an open mind 
and offered only a half-hearted defense of the resolution. 
We believe that continued mutually respectful debate with the 
MFA on this issue will be valuable. 
 
2. (SBU) In addition to continuing our dialogue with the GOR, 
we also plan to meet with Muslim leaders after the January 
Russian New Year holiday, in order to promote greater 
understanding of U.S. priorities defending respect both for 
free expression and for religious sensitivities.  We intend 
to open a continuing dialogue with these leaders, and, via 
this relationship, we plan to engage Muslim youth as well. 
Working with our Public Affairs Section, we will expand 
ongoing activities that engage Muslim students at the 
American Centers and Corners, universities and high schools, 
and informal meetings with youth groups, in which we will 
exchange ideas with participants and offer the U.S. 
perspective on religious tolerance and pluralism.  Post will 
continue its ongoing policy of maximizing regional travel, 
and plans to capitalize on the Secretary's highly successful, 
widely publicized trip to the Republic of Tatarstan in 
October.  Post will continue to participate in the Access 
Microscholarship Program, a two-year after-school English 
language teaching program for teenagers from low-income 
families in regions with predominantly Muslim population.  As 
part of this program, in October 2009 (immediately following 
the Secretary's visit), Post distributed throughout Russia a 
book and CD-ROM with drawings and dramatizations entitled 
"Lessons in Kindness: Accessing English through Students' 
Stories."  Written by Russian Access students, the teaching 
materials promote tolerance and respect for different 
cultures and nationalities. 
 
3. (SBU) In the wake of the Tatarstan visit, on November 26 
Post received a letter from the President of Tatarstan 
suggesting broadened cooperation and exchanges between the 
U.S. and Tatarstan.  Post responded positively on December 
22, and noted that USAID has funded a Community Connections 
exchange program which will bring interfaith religious 
leaders from Tatarstan (as well as several other regions) to 
the U.S. for three to five-week homestay exchanges beginning 
in March 2010.  Two State Department International Visitor 
Leadership Programs will also bring regional religious, 
business, and education leaders from Tatarstan to the U.S. 
The December 22 letter also suggests bringing several keynote 
speakers (via the State Department's Speakers Program) to 
participate in a conference on Islam and Tolerance organized 
and hosted by the Government of Tatarstan, and increasing the 
number of American educational exchange participants in 
Tatarstan, where there are currently four Fulbright scholars, 
one Senior English Language Fellow, and nine National 
Strategic Language Initiative students. 
Rubin

Wikileaks

09MOSCOW3072, Russia’s Chief Medical Officer Wants to Expand Cooperation

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Reference ID Created Released Classification Origin
09MOSCOW3072 2009-12-21 15:41 2011-08-30 01:44 UNCLASSIFIED//FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY Embassy Moscow

VZCZCXRO2040
PP RUEHAST RUEHDBU RUEHDH RUEHHM RUEHLN RUEHMA RUEHPB RUEHPOD RUEHSK
RUEHSL RUEHTM RUEHTRO RUEHVK RUEHYG
DE RUEHMO #3072/01 3551541
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
P 211541Z DEC 09
FM AMEMBASSY MOSCOW
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC PRIORITY 5728
INFO RUEHVK/AMCONSUL VLADIVOSTOK 3425
RUEHYG/AMCONSUL YEKATERINBURG 3776
RUEHLN/AMCONSUL ST PETERSBURG 5552
RHEHNSC/NSC WASHDC
RUCNCIS/CIS COLLECTIVE
RUEHXD/MOSCOW POLITICAL COLLECTIVE
RUEHZN/ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY COLLECTIVE
RUEAUSA/DEPT OF HHS WASHINGTON DC
RUEHC/DEPT OF LABOR WASHDC
RULSDMK/DEPT OF TRANSPORTATION WASHDC
RUEHPH/CDC ATLANTA GA
RUEKJCS/SECDEF WASHDC
RHMFIUU/DTRA CT WASHINGTON DC
RHMFIUU/DTRA ALEX WASHINGTON DC
RUCPDOC/DEPT OF COMMERCE WASHDC
RUEHRC/USDA FAS WASHDC
RHEHNSC/NSC WASHDC
RUEAEPA/HQ EPA WASHDC

UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 06 MOSCOW 003072 
 
SENSITIVE 
SIPDIS 
 
DEPT FOR EUR/RUS, EUR/PGI, OES/PCI, OES/IHB 
OES/FO FOR CARTER-FOSTER 
USAID FOR GH, E&E 
HHS FOR OGHA 
HHS PLEASE PASS TO NIH AND FDA 
STATE PLEASE PASS TO NAS 
USDA FOR FAS/OSTA FOR MACKE 
 
E.O. 12958: N/A 
TAGS: TBIO PREL EAID SOCI KHIV TSPL ETRD EAGR ECON PARM
KCRM, RS 
 
SUBJECT: Russia's Chief Medical Officer Wants to Expand Cooperation 
 
MOSCOW 00003072  001.2 OF 006 
 
 
SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED -- PLEASE PROTECT ACCORDINGLY. 
 
1. (SBU) SUMMARY:  On December 15, Ambassador Beyrle met with Dr. 
Gennadiy Onishchenko, Russia's Chief Medical Officer and Director of 
the Russian Federal Service for Supervision in the Sphere of 
Consumer Protection and Human Well-Being (Rospotrebnadzor).  The 
almost 90-minute meeting was cordial and positive, with expressions 
of praise by Onishchenko for U.S. assistance, the activities of the 
Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the National Institutes of Health 
(NIH), and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). 
Onishchenko several times expressed interest in expanded 
cooperation.  Although he categorically opposed Department of 
Defense access to Virology and Biotechnology Center "Vector," he was 
open to working with civilian agencies, particularly on Vector's 
application to the World Health Organization to become a regional 
influenza collaborating center.  He agreed to study the scientific 
materials presented on the use of chlorine in poultry processing and 
said that if U.S. representatives come to discuss the issue, we 
could reach a "mutually acceptable" solution.  End Summary. 
 
HIV/AIDS: PRAISES NIH/OAR, CDC, USAID; 
LET'S DISCUSS METHADONE 
------------------------------------- 
 
2.  (SBU) Onishchenko opened the meeting by thanking Ambassador 
Beyrle at length for U.S. government work in co-organizing the 
October 2009 U.S.-Russia Workshop on HIV  Prevention Science, 
convened in connection with the Third Eastern Europe-Central Asia 
AIDS Conference.  Emphasizing the "extreme importance" of the 
conference for Russia, he said that U.S. assistance in setting the 
agenda and selecting scientists helped make it so successful. 
Working together so closely on preparations for the three regional 
conferences held since the 2006 St. Petersburg G-8 summit has helped 
Russia advance its HIV programs, which now provide ARVs to over 
60,000 people.  He intends to send "thank you" letters to Dr. 
Whitescarver, Director of the Office of AIDS Research at NIH, and to 
the Ambassador.  He commented that in particular, scientists were 
very positive about the conference, adding that after such a long 
period of relatively weak scientific contact, it was good to have 
such a large number of Russian and U.S. scientists working together. 
 (Note:  The U.S. delegation included over 150 scientists.  End 
note.)  Onishchenko then recalled the regular and effective 
bilateral interaction in the Health Committee under the 
Gore-Chernomyrdin Commission, which gave many new ideas for fruitful 
cooperation.  Reflecting on the several years during the Bush 
administration when U.S.-Russia health contacts were more distant, 
Onishchenko said that he took heart in the fact that relations are 
now being restored and we can now enjoy more frequent and regular 
contact under the new Health Working Group under the Bilateral 
Presidential Commission. 
 
3.  (SBU) Agreeing that it is useful to have structures for 
cooperation, Ambassador Beyrle highlighted the "great promise" of 
the Health Working Group because of the many concrete results of our 
health cooperation.  Explaining that he sees our HIV/AIDS 
cooperation as a model, Ambassador Beyrle said he hoped we could 
expand HIV/AIDS cooperation, particularly programs for the most 
vulnerable.  He noted that in addition to new cooperation with NIH 
on AIDS prevention science research, USAID is expecting continued 
funding and a new HIV prevention project, which was developed in 
collaboration with Rospotrebnadzor.  Once USAID has completed the 
necessary bureaucratic formalities, it will contact Rospotrebnadzor 
to establish routine working arrangements to advance cooperation. 
 
MOSCOW 00003072  002.2 OF 006 
 
 
CDC's HIV surveillance is also very important.  Onishchenko called 
U.S. experience on HIV/AIDS "extremely interesting" for Russia, and 
stated that cooperation with USAID and CDC should "absolutely" 
continue. 
 &#
x000A;4.  (SBU) Thanking the Ambassador for personally attending the 
Regional Conference and making one of the speeches at the opening 
plenary, Onishchenko turned to the topic of the use of methadone in 
medication-assisted therapy for injecting drug users as a means of 
preventing the spread of AIDS.  (Note:  This topic was one of the 
more heated issues discussed at the conference.)  Onishchenko 
reiterated his often-stated conviction that using methadone as 
treatment is tantamount to legalizing of addictive narcotics. 
Russia does not support this approach and has "its own methods" for 
treatment of drug dependency. Onishchenko declared that he often 
uses the argument that there must still be concern in the United 
States because the federal government has not approved methadone's 
use, only some states.  (Note:  The federal government has had 
guidelines for several decades on methadone's use as treatment. 
Onishchenko could be confused because Medicaid funding for methadone 
is on a state-by-state basis, with some states including payment for 
methadone and others not.  We will try to clarify this with 
Onishchenko when the opportunity arises.  End note.)  However, he 
stated that methadone should be an acceptable subject in a 
discussion of international best practices.  He then said that he 
would welcome data about the results of methadone's use and would 
welcome the opportunity to engage with the international experts. 
The Ambassador said we would be pleased to get Onishchenko more 
information on the results of methadone.  (Note:  To follow up on 
this, USAID will work with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health 
Services Administration at HHS to collect the data.  End note.) 
 
5.  (SBU) Onishchenko was also positive about needle exchange 
programs, saying that they were proving effective.  He strongly 
endorsed civil society involvement in battling AIDS, saying that 
while civil society is not well developed in Russia, its engagement 
is "absolutely essential."  Peer counseling is useful.  Recalling 
the "ABC" policies (Abstinence, Being faithful and Condom use as 
appropriate) of the Bush Administration in AIDS prevention, he said 
that such a policy has an important role to play -- with children in 
school, for example.  However, for AIDS-infected adults, something 
more is needed to address both the medical and psychological aspects 
of HIV, particularly within the drug user population.  Stigma and 
discrimination are major problems and could be an area of joint work 
with the United States, which has a lot of experience in addressing 
this issue.  Noting the effectiveness of celebrities such as Anna 
Kournikova in reducing stigma, the Ambassador called her visit an 
example of a useful communication channel. Onishchenko noted that 
even in the area of stigma, Russia is making progress.  Russians are 
starting to adopt HIV-positive children, which was unheard-of only 
several years ago. 
 
INFLUENZA: THANKS FOR HELP ON H1N1; 
WANT CLOSER COOPERATION 
---------------------------------- 
 
6.  (SBU) Continuing his praise of U.S. cooperation, Onishchenko 
said U.S. help was much appreciated during H1N1 influenza outbreak 
in April 2009.  He particularly appreciated that CDC expeditiously 
provided strains of the virus for study in Russian labs, and later 
the vaccine strains that Russia used to develop its four vaccines. 
He stressed that it was particularly productive and encouraging to 
be able to cooperate with the native Russian-speaking experts at 
 
MOSCOW 00003072  003.2 OF 006 
 
 
CDC; this helped get past roadblocks such as the usual "ritual 
dances of diplomats" and political rhetoric to achieve practical 
successes. 
 
7.  (SBU) Onishchenko urged that the U.S. and Russia need to 
cooperate more closely on influenza.  He asked for U.S. support for 
Russia's plan to make the Virology and Biotechnology Center "Vector" 
near Novosibirsk the fifth WHO Regional Collaborating Center (CC) 
for influenza.  (Note:  After the CCs in the U.S. (CDC, Atlanta), 
UK, Japan, and Australia.  End note.)  He said that Vector is now 
well-equipped and he could "guarantee" professionalism and skills of 
scientists working there.  Sooner or later, he said, a major 
pandemic will appear, and we need to be prepared.  This is 
particularly troublesome in the post-Soviet space, where Russia and 
Kazakhstan share a long and porous border.  He noted that he 
particularly regrets the lack of Russian-U.S. activities in the CIS 
to prevent infectious diseases.  China could also be a source for 
the spread of many infectious diseases.  Emphasizing that pandemic 
preparedness would be a good area for bilateral cooperation, he 
recalled the discussion he had on this topic with Senator Lugar, 
whom he called a straightforward, solid professional. (Note: During 
Russia's G-8 Presidency in 2006, Onishchenko proposed that Vector 
become a full-scope WHO CC on Influenza.  Although Russia applied 
for this status soon thereafter, WHO only awarded Vector the status 
of an H5N1 (avian influenza) CC in June 2009.  WHO regional 
influenza CCs are expected to share flu strains and provide access 
to visiting foreign scientists.  However, we have heard that Vector 
is still not very active in sharing strains.  Vector regularly 
denies access to U.S. officials and we understand that Vector also 
denied access to visitors from China and Kazakhstan who came on a 
recent H5N1-related visit.  The only visit Vector allowed recently 
was from the WHO smallpox team.  In addition to Vector's lack of 
openness, there are remaining questions about its expertise in 
epidemiology.  As a virology/molecular biology research institution, 
Vector has had limited experience with human influenza.  Vector 
reports to Rospotrebnadzor, unlike Russia's two premier influenza 
institutes, the Influenza Institute in St. Petersburg and the 
Ivanovskiy Institute of Virology in Moscow, both of which are WHO 
influenza CCs for Russia and report to the Russian Academy of 
Medical Sciences.  Both of these institutes have decades of 
experience in influenza surveillance and both have made it clear to 
professional counterparts their negative view of Onischenko's desire 
to turn Vector into the regional WHO influenza CC.  End note.) 
 
CONCLUDE A COOPERATION AGREEMENT WITH CDC 
----------------------------------------- 
 
8.  (SBU) Returning to the subject of cooperation with CDC, 
Ambassador Beyrle recalled that during Onishchenko's June 2008 visit 
to CDC in Atlanta, both sides discussed creating a bilateral working 
group on infectious diseases.  The Ambassador relayed that CDC is 
interested in continuing those discussions and asked what 
Onishchenko's highest priorities are for cooperation.  Commented on 
how "strange" it is that a professional institution like CDC is led 
by political appointees, Onishchenko recalled that after his visit 
for meetings with CDC's previous leadership, he received the U.S. 
side's suggestions to the Rospotrebnadzor-produced draft cooperation 
agreement.  But then the U.S. elections came, and the draft 
"expired" with the coming of CDC's new leadershi
p.  He said it would 
be "appropriate" to renew those talks and conclude an agreement to 
exchange specialists, share knowledge, and hold conferences. 
Ambassador Beyrle said that we could invite CDC to send experts to 
Moscow in early 2010 to resume those talks. 
 
MOSCOW 00003072  004.2 OF 006 
 
 
 
9.  (SBU) Note: We do not recall any actual draft agreement. 
However, Onishchenko's exchange of letters with then CDC Director 
Dr.Gerberding outline the following areas of interest: actions to 
advance the Declaration on Cooperation in Infectious Diseases 
Prevention, adopted at the G-8 summit in St. Petersburg in 2006; 
measures to prevent the spread of avian influenza and collaboration 
in the framework of activities of the WHO influenza collaborating 
centers; timely response to emergency situations with sanitary 
epidemiological implications, including training programs for 
experts working in this area; improving epidemiological 
surveillance, prevention and control of HIV while taking into 
account the prospects of development of an HIV vaccine; implementing 
International Health Regulations and exchange of best practices; 
implementation of WHO resolutions on smallpox in preparation for the 
World Health Assembly in 2010; and tuberculosis prevention and 
control.  Each time the Ambassador tried to propose a CDC visit or 
ask about priorities for cooperation with CDC, Onishchenko returned 
to the topic of an agreement.  To move forward, it may be helpful 
for CDC to develop a very simple letter of intent that CDC intends 
to develop a joint working group with Rospotrebandzor (and possibly 
Ministry of Health and Social Development).  We would share this 
with Rospotrebnadzor (and possibly MOHSD) prior to the visit, noting 
that CDC plans to explore specific areas for collaboration during 
the visit.  End note. 
 
SMALLPOX AND ANTHRAX COOPERATION; U.S. POSITION ON BWC? 
--------------------------------------------- --------- 
 
10.  (SBU) Onishchenko reflected that the United States and Russia 
share the burden and joint responsibility for working with WHO to 
safeguard our repositories of smallpox.  U.S.-Russian cooperation on 
smallpox research in the wake of 9/11 had been critical in stemming 
the fear of terrorism at that time.  He remembered the visit of 
Glenn Schweitzer and David Franz of the National Academy of Sciences 
in March 2009 and their dialog on anthrax.  Their tremendous 
experience and authority allowed them to have a frank discussion 
with him on the need for joint work, "since working alone, you can 
fall into the void."  They were persuasive that the risk of the 
"human factor" in securing biomaterials cannot ever be discounted. 
For this reason, Onishchenko agreed that continuing cooperation on 
counterterrorism would also be "appropriate."  We could, for 
example, work together under the Convention on Biological Weapons. 
He was interested in the position of the new U.S. administration on 
biological weapons convention that is "rotting" in Geneva, which he 
noted, unlike other conventions on WMD, does not have an enforcement 
mechanism.  (Note:  Post has seen Under-Secretary Tauscher's remarks 
that the Obama administration will not seek to revive negotiations 
on a verification protocol to the BWC because a legally binding 
protocol would not achieve meaningful verification or greater 
security since it is extraordinarily difficult to verify compliance. 
 However, we would appreciate Department's guidance on if/how it 
would like us to respond to Onishchenko on this topic.  End note.) 
 
SMOKING PREVENTION: VERY INTERESTED IN U.S. EXPERIENCE 
--------------------------------------------- --------- 
 
11.  (SBU) The Ambassador noted that when he had discussed the 
Health Working Group with Deputy Minister of Health and Social 
Development Skvortsova the previous day, Skvortsova had said she was 
open to the input of various health agencies and institutes.  He 
expressed hope that Rospotrebnadzor would be an active participant, 
noting that the current interest matrix included few Rospotrebnadzor 
 
MOSCOW 00003072  005.2 OF 006 
 
 
activities.  Onishchenko responded that he would be most interested 
in U.S. legislation and actions to prevent smoking.  He commented 
that Americans were lucky when the Clinton Administration took 
office and the "current Secretary of State" took up the cause of 
battling smoking.  The U.S. won its fight against the "fat cats." 
However, he said, "Russia was not so lucky, because the four biggest 
U.S. tobacco companies moved into our market and became an enormous 
force."  Now, he said, 400 billion cigarettes are produced every 
year in Russia even though not a single tobacco plant is grown in 
Russia.  He admired the U.S. and Canadian practice in reducing 
demand for tobacco products by raising prices through excise taxes. 
However, he said, the tobacco lobby is very strong in Russia, and 
these policies are very difficult to pass, as was witnessed by the 
adoption of tobacco technical regulations, which, according to 
Onishchenko, are too mild.  (Note:  There is draft legislation 
currently circulating in Russia to support anti-smoking measures and 
consider taxation.  End note.)  When the Ambassador told a personal 
story that proved how effective anti-smoking education was in 
schools, Onishchenko expressed strong interest in the U.S. 
experience in smoking prevention, including such programs for school 
children. 
 
CHLORINE AND CHICKEN; COOPERATION ON FOOD SAFETY 
--------------------------------------------- --- 
 
12.  (SBU) The Ambassador raised the issue of Russian regulations 
that threaten to cut off hundreds of millions of dollars in poultry 
and pork trade between the U.S. and Russia by strictly limiting the 
amount of chlorine that can be used in poultry processing and 
insisting on zero tolerance for antibiotics.  While our 
veterinarians continue discussing the science, the Ambassador 
argued, we should hold off on these bans.  Recalling discussions 
with U.S. experts in November 2008 on moisture content, Onishchenko 
stated that he had said at that time he was willing to negotiate and 
had agreed to that the two sides would work over the next year on a 
step-by-step basis to address the concerns, but the process had 
stopped.  Onishchenko claimed that since 1994, the vast majority of 
Russian poultry processors have abandoned the use of chlorine and 
switched over to cold airdrying and vinegar as an antibacterial 
agent.  This, he said, is a more modern, safer, and more effective 
method.  He had met two weeks earlier with a representative from the 
European Commission, which is also not using chlorine. 
 
13.  (SBU) The Minister Counselor for Agricultural Affairs 
emphasized that chlorine processing is effective, and several 
scientific studies have shown that it has no harmful health effects. 
 He noted that representatives from U.S. industry had travelled to 
Russia in February/March 2009, but acknowledged that their 
discussions were focused primarily on moisture content, not 
chlorine.  He explained that two U.
S. universities had completed 
studies on chlorine use in poultry processing in 2009 that concluded 
that it is safe.  It is also cost effective.  Onishchenko said he 
and his experts would examine the scientific studies.  He suggested 
that U.S. poultry producers should come directly to Rospotrebnadzor 
to discuss the issue.  He also asked (perhaps rhetorically) "Why 
don't you allow your companies to transfer to the newer technology?" 
 Finally he said, "Drag them [the people who understand the science] 
here by the scruffs of their necks.  We'll talk and come to a 
mutually agreeable solution."  When the Ambassador added the 
Ministry of Health and Social Development (MOHSD) was willing to 
participate in discussions in the Agriculture Working Group of the 
Bilateral Presidential Commission on this topic and asked if 
Rospotrebnadzor would be as well, Onishchenko answered without 
 
MOSCOW 00003072  006.2 OF 006 
 
 
hesitation, "Absolutely.  We must cooperate on food safety." 
 
NO DOD ACCESS TO VECTOR LAB, EXCEPT TO COMPLETE AUDIT 
--------------------------------------------- -------- 
 
14.  (SBU) Turning to the issue of access to Vector, the Ambassador 
said that Onishchenko had written to the International Science and 
Technology Center that its assistance is no longer required on 
smallpox projects at Vector.  U.S. government inspectors have been 
repeatedly denied access to Vector to verify the work performed 
under a $3 million bio-security upgrade project begun in 2006, as 
required under the project agreement.  Onishchenko said that 
civilian cooperation is perfectly acceptable, as in the case of the 
two-year project being carried out now under the auspices of the 
World Health Organization (WHO). (Note: As far as we know, there is 
no current U.S.-Russian smallpox work. End note) Civilians are more 
transparent and open, he said.  However, as he told the Ambassador's 
predecessors, if the request is from the Department of Defense, he 
will never accept it, even if it is from "over the shoulder" of a 
civilian organization.  If access is necessary to complete an audit 
to fulfill reporting requirements, it can be arranged.  DTRA should 
simply re-submit their access request, and it will be re-examined. 
(Note:  DTRO-M will draft such a request.  End note.) 
 
15.  (SBU) Comment:  Most Russians know Onishchenko from his 
hundreds of press conferences and ceaseless travel all over Russia. 
Although most respect him for his dedication, hard work, and 
knowledge, his reputation with the broader public has been tainted 
by his central role in decisions to ban foreign food products for 
alleged safety reasons, when the bans were clearly motivated by 
political concerns.  Onishchenko does not have warm relations with 
MOHSD, to which he is technically subordinate.  He is in the midst 
of a political battle with the MOHSD that may result in a reduced 
role for Rospotrebnadzor in the area of HIV/AIDS programs and 
greater role for the MOHSD. Rospotrebnadzor may have already lost 
about 240 million rubles (apx $8 million) to the MOSHD for HIV/AIDs 
prevention work in 2010. In the past few months, he has made far 
fewer public statements on H1N1, with Deputy Minister Skvortsova 
taking the media spotlight.  This was the warmest meeting with 
Onishchenko that we can remember in the past few years.  Despite his 
political battles with MOHSD, Onishchenko still is very influential 
and a valuable partner.  It is well worth following up on the many 
openings he provided during this meeting, particularly since many 
are high priorities for the Health Working Group. 
 
BEYRLE

Wikileaks

09MOSCOW3018, MFA AIRS UNSCR 1540 CONCERNS AT EXBS MEETING

WikiLeaks Link

To understand the justification used for the classification of each cable, please use this WikiSource article as reference.
Discussing cables
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Reference ID Created Released Classification Origin
09MOSCOW3018 2009-12-16 11:42 2011-08-30 01:44 UNCLASSIFIED//FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY Embassy Moscow

VZCZCXYZ0019
RR RUEHWEB

DE RUEHMO #3018 3501142
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
R 161142Z DEC 09
FM AMEMBASSY MOSCOW
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC 5668
RUEAORC/USCBP WASHDC
RHEBAAA/USDOE WASHDC
RUCPDOC/DEPT OF COMMERCE WASHDC
RULSJGA/COMDT COGARD WASHINGTON DC
RECNEXC/EXPORT CONTROL AND RELATED BORDER SECURITY
RUEKJCS/SECDEF WASHDC
RUEKJCS/JOINT STAFF WASHDC
RHMFIUU/DEPT OF JUSTICE WASHDC
RUEATRS/DEPT OF TREASURY WASHDC
RUEAIIA/CIA WASHDC

UNCLAS MOSCOW 003018 
 
SIPDIS, SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED 
 
STATE FOR ISN/ECC JFRIEDMAN, ACHURCH, ROWEN, NJOHANSON, LSPRINGER 
CBP FOR INA, PASS TO TCORWIN 
USDOE ALSO FOR NNSA, PASS TO TPERRY 
 
 
 
E.O. 12958: N/A 
TAGS: ETTC MNUC PARM PREL KSTC KNNP UP RS
SUBJECT:  MFA AIRS UNSCR 1540 CONCERNS AT EXBS MEETING 
 
1.  Begin summary:  On Tuesday, December 8, the EXBS Advisor and 
EXBS Assistant met with representatives of the export controls 
section within the Security and Disarmament Department of the 
Russian Foreign Ministry.  During this meeting, MFA took the 
opportunity to raise concerns about issues related to implementation 
of UNSCR 1540 and arms control compliance - items outside the focus 
of the meeting agenda.  End summary. 
 
2.  Present were the Deputy Director of the Security and Disarmament 
Department, Grigory Ivanovich Mashkov; Anatoliy Mikhailovich 
Bulochnikov, Advisor; and Alexander Odoevskiy, Attache.  The purpose 
of the meeting was to receive MFA's feedback on the proposed agenda 
for the February 2-3, 2010 Program Review and February 4 Export 
Licensing Exchange in Washington.  MFA requested that the following 
topics be added to the first day's discussions:  Nuclear Suppliers 
Group; Zangger Committee; Global Initiative to Combat Nuclear 
Terrorism; MTCR; Hague Code of Conduct; International Missile 
Experts' Group; Australia Group; Wassenaar Arrangement. 
Additionally, we had sent MFA a summary table of FY08, FY09, and 
FY10 program activities ahead of the meeting for their review and 
approval.  The discussion lasted a little under an hour, and was 
generally productive. 
 
---------------------- 
Concerning UNSCR 1540 
---------------------- 
 
3.  In the past, MFA has used the occasion of our discussions to 
bring up topics which are not within the strict purview of the EXBS 
program.  Such was the case on this day.  Mashkov spoke about the 
U.S. view on creating a multilateral fund to support implementation 
of UN Security Council Resolution 1540.  Referring to his numerous 
exchanges with the U.S. 1540 Coordinator, Thomas Wuchte, Mashkov 
said he was disappointed that he had only recently received a reply 
to his message sent March 2009 expressing concerns about the 
usefulness and necessity of such a fund.  Mashkov complained that 
the U.S. response was merely a formal reply that did not address the 
Russian side's concerns over justification for use of the money.  He 
said that the fund would be used simply to hire more bureaucrats and 
would not accomplish anything substantive. 
---------------------- 
Concerning compliance 
---------------------- 
 
4.  Mr. Mashkov also made a passing comment about the U.S. 2005 arms 
control compliance report, which he characterized as a "complicating 
element" in U.S.-Russian bilateral relations.  He asserted that the 
report accuses Russia of violations which Russia did not commit.  He 
did not provide clarification as to what the alleged violations 
were. 
-------------------------------- 
Concerning MFA personnel changes 
-------------------------------- 
 
5.  Mashkov told us that Alexander Mikhailovich Deineko, who had 
been serving as head of the export controls section, had been 
promoted to a position with responsibility for military-technical 
cooperation within the Security and Disarmament Department of the 
Foreign Ministry. 
 
BEYRLE

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